Map works > No man's land

Small work: 7 ½”x 7 ½” each
Combination of mineral pigment, water color, walnut ink, micro pigment pen, water-soluble wax crayon, and tea on paper*
(*different variations for each work)

Large work: 20”x 20” each
Mineral pigment on Japanese paper (kumohada mashi) over board

Read the statement at the bottom.

Trenches
Mineral pigment, watercolor, micro pigment pen, walnut ink and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Crossing Dangerous Water
Mineral pigment, watercolor, micro pigment pen, walnut ink and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Dark Territories
Mineral pigment, watercolor, micro pigment pen, walnut ink and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Stuck en-route
Mineral pigment, watercolor, micro pigment pen, walnut ink and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
No man's land 3,770
Mineral pigment, watercolor, micro pigment pen, walnut ink and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Good bye Sayonara So long
Mineral pigment, watercolor, micro pigment pen, walnut ink and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Deep divide
Mineral pigment, watercolor, micro pigment pen, and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Battle between
Mineral pigment, walnut ink, micro pigment pen, gel pen (gold), and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Land and sea
Mineral pigment, walnut ink, micro pigment pen, metallic pen, typewriter ink and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Lost in the sea
Mineral pigment, walnut ink, micro pigment pen, metallic pen, typewriter ink and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Mapping
Mineral pigment, walnut ink, micro pigment pen, gel pen (gold), and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Climbing the mountains
Mineral pigment, watercolor, micro pigment pen, metallic pen, and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"
Silly question
Mineral pigment, watercolor, water-soluble wax crayon, micro pigment pen, typewriter ink, and tea on paper
Approx. 7.5"x 7.5"

No man’s land series explores the space and dividing line between land and water, territories for new negotiation due to sea level rise in the future. I’m imagining the space where possible battles may occur between land and water—a middle ground for negotiation. The sea level is estimated to rise six feet by 2100. Many of the coastal lines will be quite different then. Much of Boston, and many other coastal towns, will be under water. At the time of creating this series, still ongoing Syrian war and migration crisis over the Mediterranean Sea dominated the media. The news about the Syrian migration also influenced me. In particular when I learned that 3,770 migrants have died trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea in 2015, according to the data on International Organization for Migration.

My works depict imaginary topographies created by drowning and submerging a paper in a tray filled with water that is mixed with tea and mineral pigment. The act of creating a storm surge in a tray by human hands—actually a very small act of tilting a tray back and forth—makes me think that any astronomical events could be a result of accumulation of small acts by individuals.