Recent Work > Extinction Studies

Extinction Studies
2019 - ongoing
Works on paper

In 2015, I worked on a series called Water, is Taught by Thirst at the Blue Mountain Center, an artist residency located at the heart of Adirondacks in northern New York State. I had a map of the Central Adirondacks, and I was tracing the waterways from the map for my work. When I was tracing those waterways from the map, I noticed that there were many names of animals, such as “Eagle lake,” “Little Otter Pond,” “Buck Mountain,” “Beaver Brook,” “Salmon River,” and so forth, as if to keep me company along the rivers and lakes, and up on the mountains.

In my Extinction Studies series, I research maps of the Adirondack region and trace animal names from the maps for my drawings. Floating in a sea of blackness, these names become stars in the sky, constellations, and ghosts of our memories of places we hold dear.

The Adirondack region became a place very dear to me, because of the Blue Mountain Center and the natural beauty this region offers.

Can animals cry out even from maps?

Read more about the history of Adirondacks at the bottom.

1888 Adirondack Wilderness
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
1888 Adirondack Wilderness, detail
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
1888 Adirondack Wilderness, detail
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
1888 Adirondack Wilderness, detail
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
1888 Adirondack Wilderness, detail
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
1888 Adirondack Wilderness, detail
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
1888 Adirondack Wilderness, detail
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
1888 Adirondack Wilderness, detail
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
1888 Adirondack Wilderness, detail
India ink, walnut ink, and ink on paper
86"x 70" (diptych)
2019
Map of Saranac Lake and Surrounding Area, 1954
India Ink on BFK Rives Paper
42.5"x 53"
2019
Map of Upper Saranc Lake and Surrounding Area, 1954, detail
India Ink on BFK Rives Paper
42.5"x 53"
2019
Map of Saranac Lake and Surrounding Area, 1954, detail
India Ink on BFK Rives Paper
42.5"x 53"
2019
Map of Upper Saranac Lake and Surrounding Area, 1954, detail
India Ink on BFK Rives Paper
42.5"x 53"
2019
Map of Raquette Lake, New York, Provisional Edition 1997
India ink, pen and acid-free white gel pen on BFK Rives paper
31.5"x 42"
2019
Map of Raquette Lake, New York, Provisional Edition 1997, detail
India ink, pen and acid-free white gel pen on BFK Rives paper
31.5"x 42"
2019
Work in progress: Installation, detail
India ink on paper
Variable
2019
Work in progress: Installation, detail
India ink on paper
Variable
2019
Work in progress: Installation, detail
India ink on paper
Variable
2019
Lit Otter Big Otter
India ink on paper
5.2"x 6.9"
2019
Duck Moose
India ink on paper
5.31"x 5.37"
2019
Lit Salmon
India ink on paper
15"x 11"
2019
Moose Elk Elk Deadwate
India ink on paper
9.75"x 12"
2019
Moose 2
India ink on paper
5.35"x 5.75"
2019
Moose Lost
India ink on paper
7.13"x 7.26"
2019
Mosquito
India ink on paper
5.3"x 5.95"
2019
Trou
India ink on paper
9.88"x 9.92"
2019
Trout Moose Wild Goose Big Moose
India ink on paper
9.74"x 9.82"
2019
Trout 2
India ink on paper
10.98"x 14.92"
2019
Trout
India ink on paper
5.38"x 11.94"
2019
Wolf Beaver
India ink on paper
5.96"x 5.32"
2019

In 1885, the Adirondack Forest Preserve was prompted by the public outcry over declining water quality and the deforestation of the land in the Adirondack region. Today’s Adirondack Park, a six-million acre parcel of public and private lands, was established in 1892 to protect the region from uncontrolled deforestation.

Once unknown and unexplored by the early Europeans, this area was referred to as “the Dismal Wilderness” by the area’s Native Americans, and was shown as a blank space in a 1771 map. By 1850, the European settlers had destroyed enough of the Adirondack forest that it became a growing concern for the public, “as the continued depletion of watershed woodlands reduced the soil's ability to hold water, hastening topsoil erosion and exaggerating periods of flooding.” The lumber industry alone was not responsible for the deforestation, the tanning industry used the hemlock trees, the paper industry used spruce and fir, and the charcoal industry used all sizes and kinds of timber.